Tuesday, December 11, 2007

COMING UP

December 19th
Electro_____
UWM DIVAS Program Junior/Senior Project
from 6-9 pm at Kenilworth Square East
free and open to the public
1925 E. Kenilworth Pl.,
4th floor (entrance on building's west side).

Electro_____ is a multimedia exhibition that showcases upperclassmen students’ semester-long projects including interactive installations, animations, and performance pieces.

Featuring work from
Brennan Alcott
Chris Campbell
Caitlin Christman
Miles Fabishak
Matteo Garcia
Aaron Hart
Sarandos Klikizos
Todd Ruehmer
Kyle Redlin

The UWM inter-arts program DIVAS [Digital Imaging, Visualization, Animation & Sound] was created in 2002. The program aims to explore new media, technology-oriented production and theory at the blurred boundaries of video, electronic music, visual art, web based art, robotics, and programming.

Tuesday, December 11

UWM Union Theater
7pm
Ugetsu
(Ugetsu Monogatari, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 97 min., 1953)



In a sixteenth-century village, a potter is seduced by an exquisitely beautiful woman who turns out to be a phantom. Mizoguchi's rigorous compositions and camerawork, his use of the mist-enshrouded landscape around Lake Biwa, the intense performances of two of Japan's greatest actresses (Kyo and Tanaka), and the theme of the illusory nature of human ambition and desire: all contribute to a work of infinite beauty and significance. “Simultaneously realistic, allegorical and supernatural, Ugetsu is the most stylistically perfect of all Mizoguchi's work…” - David L. Cook.

Wednesday, December 12

No postings.

Thursday, December 13

America's Black Holocaust Museum
7pm
Homecomings
(dir. Charlene Gilbert, 1999, 56 min)




Presented by theCommunity Media Project, in association with America's Black Holocaust Museum and UWM's Cultures and Communities.

The documentary details the struggle that African-American farmers faced when trying to purchase their own land once freed from slavery, both with the Southern white farmers who refused to cooperate, and the federal agencies who were supposed to be helping them. A talkback with the filmmaker will follow.

More information about the film: http://www.pbs.org/itvs/homecoming/film1.html

America's Black Holocaust Museum is located at 2233 N. 4th St.
Suggested donation: $5 for adults / $3 for students

The "Disparities and Misconceptions" film series at America's Black Holocaust Museum will highlight films that magnify struggles that African-Americans face in attempts to overcome disparities in access to resources, often met with forceful resistance. Topics that these films will explore include removal from one's land, urban revolt in response to racial injustice, and petitioning the government to retain one's resources.

For more information, call (414) 264-2500, or e-mail mcfaddendonte@gmail.com

Friday, December 14

UWM Union Theater
7pm
Student Film Festival
A juried showcase of the best short films and videos from the students of the pioneering UWM Film Department. Followed by an exhibit of photography work.

Saturday, December 15

UWM Union Theater
7pm *FREE*
Senior Screening
A special evening showcasing the films and videos completed by the UWM Department of Film's graduating seniors.

Sunday, December 16

No postings.

Monday, December 3, 2007

Tuesday, December 4

UWM Union Theater
7pm *FREE*
Byron Hurt Screening of Hip Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes
Presented by the “It's Bigger than Hip Hop” Series



Social Justice: Hip Hop Under a Microscope
An inspiring and enlightening evening with Byron Hurt, filmmaker and anti-sexist activist. The evening begins with a screening of his film, Hip Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes, a "loving critique" of certain disturbing developments in mainstream rap music culture. Hurt will provide his commentary on representations of gender roles in hip-hop and rap music. Please stick around to add your thoughts on the subject during the Q and A.

Sponsored by the UWM Union Sociocultural Programming, UWM Union Programming, the Helen Bader School of Social Work, the Women's Resource Center, Norris Health Center, Cultures and Communities, and the Community Media Project.

For more information, contact Rebecca Grassl, 414-229-3728.

Wednesday, December 5

DocUquarium Series – last screening of the year!!
Don’t forget to viisit the DocUquarium blog at http://docuquarium.groups.vox.com/.

UWM Union Theater
7h30pm *FREE*
An Unreasonable Man
(Henriette Mantel and Steve Skrovan, USA, 122 min, 2006)

Guest David Bollier, former Nader Raider and interviewee, in person!



In 1966, General Motors, the most powerful corporation in the world, sent private investigators to dig up dirt on an obscure thirty-two year old public interest lawyer named Ralph Nader, who had written a book critical of one of their cars, the Corvair. The scandal that ensued after the revelation of this smear campaign launched Ralph Nader into national prominence and established him as one of the most admired Americans and the leader of the modern Consumer Movement. Over the next thirty years and without ever holding public office, Nader built a legislative record that is the rival of any contemporary president. Many things consumers take for granted such as seat belts, airbags and product labeling are largely due to the efforts of Ralph Nader and his citizen groups. Cast as a "spoiler candidate" in the 2000 presidential election, he has become a pariah even among former friends and allies. How did this happen? An Unreasonable Man traces the life and career of Ralph Nader, one of the most unique, important, and controversial political figures of the past half century.

Guest David Bollier is a former Nader Raider featured in the film, and he's an author, journalist and a Senior Fellow at University of Southern California's Annenberg School for Communication. A co-founder of Public Knowledge, he advocates for the public domain, especially in the digital realm. He's written several books, including Silent Theft, about the privatization of things that belong to the public, from the sky to seeds to our genes — The Commons.

The film will be screened again at Discovery World on Dec. 6 (see details bellow).

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Basement Cinema
Mitchell Hall - Room B91

Basement Cinema is a student-run series of B and unusual commercial movies.
More information at http://basementcinema.wordpress.com
This week: A question that seems to perplex America is “What would happen if a black man entered a white man’s world.” And who better than Hollywood to address such a quandary.

8pm *FREE*
The Things with Two Heads
(Lee Frost, 1972, 93 minutes)



A rich, white bigot is about to die, but he’s got plan. He hopes to graft his head onto another’s body. The problem is the only available candidate is a black man from death row. Ray Milland stars as the bigot and former pro football player Rosey Greer stars as the body. Together they form a bickering odd couple thrown into a series of wild events that play up their racial differences and the comical image of Ray Milland’s head sitting atop Rosey’s shoulders.

10pm *FREE*
Change of Mind
(Robert Stevens, 1969, 98 minutes)



A film so rare in the US we had to get our copy from overseas! Come see a white man’s brain transplanted into a black man’s body. Once David Rowe’s brain is moved into the skull of a black man doctor’s, law officials, even his own wife start to question who David is. Is David a white man with a black man’s body or a black man with a white man’s brain? Even David is unsure of who he is especially when old friends change their attitude towards the new David, even allowing him to become the victim of racism. Made during a moment of high racial tensions in the US, Change of Mind calls into question what makes a man. Duke Ellington’s music provides the score to this film that was a bit ‘a head’ of its time.

Thursday, December 6

Noon at Alterra
Coffee with DocUquarium guest David Bollier (featured in An Unreasonable Man)
Alterra Coffee Roasters – 2211 N. Prospect Ave.
Join us for an intimate chat with this former Nader Raider and interviewee in this week’s DocUquarium film “An Unreasonable Man”.

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Discovery World
7pm
An Unreasonable Man
(Henriette Mantel and Steve Skrovan, USA, 122 min, 2006)

Guest David Bollier, former Nader Raider and interviewee, in person!
Discovery World is located at 500 N. Harbor Drive.

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UWM Union Theater
Seven Masterpieces by Kenji Mizoguchi
Thursday – Tuesday, December 6-11

Japanese director Kenji Mizoguchi began his career in the silent-film era and quickly became known for his vehement independence and uncompromising artistry. This series will present seven beautifully restored 35mm film prints, which are unequaled in their pictorial and narrative richness and emotional force. All films are FREE and open to the public. Films are in Japanese with English subtitles. Series organized by James Quandt, Cinematheque Ontario.

7pm
Story of the Last Chrysanthemums
(Zangiku monogatari, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 142 min., 1939)



A majestic and moving Mizoguchi, in which the director refined the style for which he became famous, Story of the Last Chrysanthemums, is set in the nineteenth-century world of Kabuki actors. A young actor is expelled from his family because of his lazy, unprofessional attitude towards the art of Kabuki. He is saved from dissolution by the family's maid, who urges him to perfect his technique. She sacrifices everything for him, and, in the famous final sequence, splendidly shot in the canals of Osaka ; her sacrifice becomes total just as he triumphs as a great actor.

Friday, December 7

Conference / Symposium
From Magna Carta to Sky Trust: The Historical Arc of the Commons
10am - 4pm
Hosted by the Center for 21st Century Studies
American Geographical Library
3rd floor, east wing of UWM Golda Meir Library

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UWM Union Theater
7pm
Sansho the Bailiff
(Sansho Dayu, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 123 min., 1954)



In eleventh-century Japan , a family is dispersed: the father is exiled by a cruel governor, the mother is sold as a courtesan, and the children are sent to a remote province as slaves. Rarely did Mizoguchi achieve the balance between barbaric violence and formal beauty that he did here. Miyagawa's cinematography, with its awe-inspiring long takes and complex use of background and offscreen space, lends even the most harrowing sequences an extraordinary eloquence. “The last scene of SANSHO DAYU is one of the most affecting in the history of cinema… SANSHO DAYU is one of those films for whose sake the cinema exists” - Gilbert Adair.

9h30pm
Sisters of Gion
(Gion no shimai, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 69 min, 1936)



Often considered the best Japanese film prior to the war, Sisters of Gion presents a portrait of two sisters working as geisha – one conservative and traditional, the other cynical and rebellious. Their opposing views put them in conflict with each other and their work in a Kyoto teahouse causes various sexual humiliations. The film inevitably leaves its audiences in stunned silence. Sisters of Gion was the only Mizoguchi film that ever won the Japanese award for best film of the year. "The style is sublime; the camera glides through poetic sets as emotions delicately unwind" - Michael Wilmington, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Saturday, December 8

UWM Union Theater
5pm
Street of Shame
(Akasen Chitai, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 85 min., 1956)



“The best of all films examining the problems of women in postwar Japan ” - Donald Richie, this overwhelming work was Mizoguchi's last. The “street of shame” runs through Tokyo 's red-light district where the women at the Dreamland salon eke out a living for their families. Mizoguchi's portrait of this group of prostitutes, from a hard-boiled glamour girl to a widow in her forties worried about her fading beauty–was so powerful in its indictment of women's oppression that, a year after its release, it led to a government bill outlawing prostitution. An ensemble of Japan 's finest actresses brings dense emotional life to this unforgettable group portrait.

7pm
Ugetsu
(Ugetsu Monogatari, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 97 min., 1953)



In a sixteenth-century village, a potter is seduced by an exquisitely beautiful woman who turns out to be a phantom. Mizoguchi's rigorous compositions and camerawork, his use of the mist-enshrouded landscape around Lake Biwa, the intense performances of two of Japan's greatest actresses (Kyo and Tanaka), and the theme of the illusory nature of human ambition and desire: all contribute to a work of infinite beauty and significance. “Simultaneously realistic, allegorical and supernatural, Ugetsu is the most stylistically perfect of all Mizoguchi's work…” - David L. Cook.

9pm
Life of Oharu
(Saikaku Ichidai Onna, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 144 min, 1952)



Mizoguchi considered Life of Oharu to be his masterpiece. No film rivals Oharu's exquisite sense of composition, and the implacability of its chronicle of the downfall of a woman. Kinuyo Tanaka, whose career was synonymous with Mizoguchi's for many years, plays Oharu, an imperious court lady of the Edo period who lives in Kyoto . When she is sold to a feudal lord, she is subjected to a series of humiliations and ends up as a broken old streetwalker. “[A]n extremely elegant movie whichever way you look at it: tiny details of movement by the actors, beautiful compositions and photography throughout, single fluid takes often serving to state a whole scene.” - TIME OUT

Sunday, December 9

UWM Union Theater
5pm
Utamaro and his Five Women
(Utamaro O Meguru Gonin no Onna, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 87 min., 1946)



A fictionalized account of revolutionary Japanese print artist Kitagawa Utamaro and those who surrounded him, his artwork was considered shocking in 18th century feudal Japan , and in Mizoguchi's film he attracts both admiration from his peers and condemnation from the Shogunate. Utamaro and his Five Women opens with a sweeping, long take of a procession of the very people Utamaro loved to paint, a scene as vividly realized and affective as the artist's own work. Utamaro and his followers find themselves in a string of duplicitous romantic encounters. During a time when both art and emotion are heavily censored the characters lash out, resorting to selfish acts of self-expression that lead to irreversible, devastating consequences.

7pm
Life of Oharu
(Saikaku Ichidai Onna, by Kenji Mizoguchi, 144 min, 1952)

Monday, November 26, 2007

Tuesday, November 27

UWM Union Theater
Experimental Tuesdays

7pm *FREE*
Nazuna
(Hitoshi Toyoda, Japan/US, 90 min, 35mm slides, 2003-4)

Hitoshi Toyoda in person!



Hitoshi Toyoda is a self-taught photographer who has worked exclusively in the medium of slideshows for the past ten years. His silent slide shows have been compared to haiku literature because of the way they are able to encompass both the minutiae of daily life and the larger, unknowable forces that govern that life. Toyoda only exhibits his work in live contexts, clicking through the slides himself.

Wednesday, November 28

DocUquarium Series – every Wednesday September 5-December 5
“Dive deep” into the newest independent documentaries this fall as filmmaker/professor Brad Lichtenstein opens up his film 301 class to the public. Nine premieres, guests every month and deep exploration guaranteed. Check the complete schedule at http://www4.uwm.edu/docuwm/ and the blog at http://docuquarium.groups.vox.com/.

This Week’s DocUquarium:

UWM Union Theater
7h30pm *FREE*
Revolution ‘67
(Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno, USA, 90 min, 2007)

Filmmakers Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and Jerome Bongiorno in person!



Revolution '67 is an illuminating account of events too often relegated to footnotes in U.S. history - the black urban rebellion of the 1960s. Focusing on the six-day Newark, N.J., outbreak in mid July, Revolution '67 reveals how the disturbances began as a spontaneous revolt against poverty and police brutality and ended as fateful milestones in America's struggles over race and economic justice. Voices from across the spectrum - activists Tom Hayden and Amiri Baraka, journalist Bob Herbert, Mayor Sharpe James, and other officials, National Guardsmen and Newark citizens - recall lessons as hard-earned then as they have been easy to neglect since.

The film will be screened again at America’s Black Holocaust Museum on Nov. 29 (see details bellow).

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Basement Cinema
Mitchell Hall - Room B91

Basement Cinema is a student-run series of B and unusual commercial movies.
More information at http://basementcinema.wordpress.com
This week: Magic vs. Muscles - two early 80’s quickies designed to cash in on the barbarian craze that was sweeping America for a minute or two.

8pm *FREE*
The Sword and the Sorcerer
(Albert Pyun, 1982, 100 minutes)




A bloody, low budget movie in the spirit of Conan or Excalibur, except this one makes very little sense. The hero and his three-bladed, jet-propelled sword must help the heroine save her brother from a demonic figure known as Cromwell. Lots of action, torture, magic, mayhem and some killer special effects.

10pm *FREE*
Deathstalker
(James Sbardellati, 1983, 80 minutes)




Self-centered blonde hunk Richard Hill is Deathstalker and former girlfriend to Hugh Hefner, Barbi Benton is a kidnapped princess. A giant tournament is staged to see who the greatest fighter in all the land is and you can probably figure who it will be. Then again, Deathstalker ain’t exactly a thinking man’s film unless that man likes to think about lots of nudity, blood, mud-wrestling, decapitations, dwarfs, and an ugly, boar headed beast man; not to mention piled on stupidity and a topless sword fighting scene.

Thursday, November 29

Noon at Alterra
Coffee with DocUquarium guests Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and Jerome Bongiorno (Revolution ‘67)
Alterra Coffee Roasters – 2211 N. Prospect Ave.
Join us for an intimate chat with the filmmakers.

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America’s Black Holocaust Museum
7pm *FREE*
Revolution ‘67
(Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno, USA, 90 min, 2007)


Followed by a panel discussion including filmmakers Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and Jerome Bongiorno.

The America’s Black Holocaust Museum is located at 2233 N 4th St.

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UWM Union Theater
7pm
Interkosmos
(Jim Finn, US, 74 min., video, 2006)




"A cosmonaut romance set aboard a 1970s East German space mission to colonize the moons of Saturn and Jupiter, Interkosmos weaves together lovingly faked archival footage, charmingly undermotivated musical numbers, propagandistic maxims ("Capitalism is like a kindergarten of boneless children"), stop motion animation (of a suitably crude GDR-era level), a Teutonic (and vaguely Herzogian) voiceover, and a superb garage-y Kraut rock score (by Jim Becker and Colleen Burke). Finn's deadpan is immaculately bone-dry, and his antiquarian fastidiousness is worthy of Guy Maddin" - Dennis Lim, VILLAGE VOICE

Sunday, November 25, 2007

Friday, November 30

2pm *FREE*
Colloquia in Conceptual Studies
Sensational! Sensing Media Arts – Theory and Practice
Kenilworth Square East
1925 E. Kenilworth Pl., 4th Floor

Tom Recchion & Jonathon Rosen
Radio Nurse: live audio-visual
Contamination and Disintegration



TOM RECCHION has been an artist/composer/art director in Southern California since the 1970’s. He is the co-creator & co-founder of the legendary art & music collective the Los Angeles Free Music Society (LAFMS). His early practice in low-tech sonic exploration presaged many of the genre’s exciting developments of the last quarter century: record manipulation, tape loops, free improvisation, found and invented instruments, installation, and more. He has worked with many musicians—Keiji Haino, David Toop, Max Eastley, Jad Fair & Half Japanese, Oren Ambarchi, Jim Thirwell, John Duncan, Christian Marclay and Sonic Youth to name a few. He is currently in 3 groups: Extended Organ with artists Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, Joe Potts and Fredrik Nilsen, Smegma in which he is “Victor Sparks,” and a trio called The Rodney Forest with Ju Suk Reet Meate and Oblivia (from Smegma). He also occasionally writes for WIRE magazine and has many recordings released on Cortical, Idea, Birdman (US), Touch (UK), Schoolmap (Italy), PSF (Japan), Meuww Muzak (Belgium) and other labels. Most recently he released 78 The Incandescent Phonograph and The Song of Mister Phonograph on a 10” 78 RPM with a grant from the City of Pasadena’s Cultural Affairs and received a commission from the Kronos Quartet. Currently he holds the position of Sr. Creative Director for EMI/Capitol Records.
His latest solo CD, Sweetly Doing Nothing, is listed in Artforum’s December 2007 Year in Review issue as one of the 10 best music events of the year. He is very tired.

JONATHON ROSEN is a painter/illustrator/film maker based in Brooklyn, NY. He makes books, drawings, paintings & animation. His work employs an obsession with medical, mechanical & carnivalesque. Collaborators & venues include: Tim Burton (Sleepy Hollow), PS.1 Museum LIC, Queens, Museum of Contemporary Art, LA., McSweeney’s, The New York Times, Paraphrase, MTV, Sony Music, Time Magazine.

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The Digital Dancing Image
Dance and Digital Media Class Showing
with Cecelia Condit and Luc Vanier

7pm *FREE*

Kennilworth Square East, Studio 660




Presented by Dance and Film Departments

with special thanks to the Theater Department

For more information call 229 2571 or email danceinfo@uwm.edu

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UWM Union Theater

7pm
I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone
(Hei Yan Quan, Tsai Ming-Liang, Taiwan/France/Austria, in Malay, Mandarin and Bengali w/ English St. , 115 min., 35mm, 2007)



Homeless on the streets of Kuala Lumpur , Hsiao Kang is robbed, beaten and left for dead. Rawang, an immigrant worker living in the shell of an abandoned building finds and nurses him. Rawang`s feelings for his patient may or may not be sexual, but there's definitely something like lust in the eyes of Chyi, a waitress in a run-down old coffee shop, for Hsiao Kang. And so a triangle forms as a blanket of noxious fog settles on the city and everyone has trouble breathing. Simultaneously erotic and comical, the film underpins director Tsai's deadpan allegory with hints of social realism.

9pm
Lights in the Dusk
(Laitakaupungin Valot - Aki Kaurismäki, Finland, in Finnish and Russian w English St., 78 min., 35mm, 2007)
Milwaukee Premiere!



Lights in the Dusk concludes Kaurismäki's ‘loser trilogy'. The first film focused on unemployment and the second on homelessness, this final installment is about loneliness. Koistinen, a night watchman searches the hard world for a small crack to crawl in through, but both his fellow beings and the faceless apparatus of the society conspire to crush his modest hopes. His longing for love leaves Koistinen open to exploitation and framed for a robbery. This dark jewel of a film glows with genuine warmth and a small but enriching glimmer of hope.

Saturday, December 1

UWM Union Theater
5pm & 9pm
I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone
(Hei Yan Quan, Tsai Ming-Liang, Taiwan/France/Austria, in Malay, Mandarin and Bengali w/ English St., 115 min., 35mm, 2007)

7pm
Lights in the Dusk
(Laitakaupungin Valot - Aki Kaurismäki, Finland, in Finnish and Russian w English St., 78 min., 35mm, 2007)

Sunday, December 2

UWM Union Theater
5pm
Lights in the Dusk
(Laitakaupungin Valot - Aki Kaurismäki, Finland, in Finnish and Russian w English St., 78 min., 35mm, 2007)

7pm
I Don’t Want to Sleep Alone
(Hei Yan Quan, Tsai Ming-Liang, Taiwan/France/Austria, in Malay, Mandarin and Bengali w/ English St., 115 min., 35mm, 2007)

Thursday, November 22, 2007

Happy Thanksgiving!

Please check back next week.

Tuesday, November 13, 2007

Tuesday, November 13

UWM Union Theater
7pm *FREE*
God Grew Tired of Us
(Christopher Dillon Quinn and Tommy Walker, USA, 89 min., 35mm, 2006)

Exploring the indomitable spirit of three “Lost Boys” from the Sudan, a tumultuous civil war orphaned John, Daniel and Panther, and they fled across sub-Saharan desert. Forming surrogate families they sought refuge from famine, disease, wild animals and rebel soldier attacks. After five years, they crossed into the UN's refugee camp in Kenya. Finally resettled in the United States , they build new lives but remain deeply committed to helping the friends and family they left behind.

John Bul Dau, subject of God Grew Tired of Us, will be the guest speaker for the Wednesday November 14th Distinguished Lecture Series.

Wednesday, November 14

DocUquarium Series – every Wednesday September 5-December 5
“Dive deep” into the newest independent documentaries this fall as filmmaker/professor Brad Lichtenstein opens up his film 301 class to the public. Nine premieres, guests every month and deep explor ation guaranteed. Check the complete schedule at http://www4.uwm.edu/docuwm/ and the blog at http://docuquarium.groups.vox.com/.

This Week’s DocUquarium:
UWM Union Theater
7h30pm *FREE*
Iron Ladies of Liberia
(Siatta Scott Johnson and Daniel Junge, USA, 77 min, 2007)

An intimate documentary that goes behind-the-scenes with Africa's first freely elected female head of state, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, president of Liberia. The film explores the challenges facing President Sirleaf and the extraordinary women surrounding her as they develop and implement policy to rebuild their ravaged country and prevent a descent back into civil war.

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Basement Cinema
Mitchell Hall - Room B91
Basement Cinema is a student-run series of B and unusual commercial movies.
More information at http://basementcinema.wordpress.com

This week: Boys Behind Bars. Back in September we had a women in prison night. So, it’s only fair of us to have a men in prison night. While not as sexploitative, boys behind bars are just as mean and nasty as these two films prove.


8pm *FREE*
Bad Boys
(Rick Rosenthal, 1983, 120 minutes)



Please do not confuse this with the horrible comedy/action film starring Martin Lawerence and the Fresh Prince. No, this film is actually good. This Bad Boys, has Sean Penn as a juvenile delinquent sent to prison for the murder of a gang member’s kid brother. After raping Penn’s girlfriend that same gang member is sent to prison, thus setting up a revenge fueled show down between these two bad boys!

10pm *FREE*
Scum
(Alan Clarke, 1979, 98 minutes)



Ray Winstone stars as Carlin, a rough punk who rules over the other boys at a London Borstal. These detention centers for juvenile delinquents did little to reform the boys who wandered in and out of their walls. More often than not they were cruel hellholes where massive power struggles between inmates turned to violent outbursts. British director Alan Clarke pulls no punches in his candid depiction of a broken system that grinds down men or turns them into animals.

Thursday, November 15

UWM Union Theater
7pm *FREE*
Locally Grown: the Brothers Riepenhoff

Brothers Joe and John Riepenhoff will select and present tonight's program of new film and video work from Milwaukee-based artists. Joe Riepenhoff is a recent graduate of UWM and John Riepenhoff is the curator of the Green Gallery and co-founder of the Milwaukee International art fair. They host a monthly film series at the Green Gallery called Movies and Masala.

Friday, November 16

UWM Union Theater
7pm
Rules of the Game
(La Regle du Jeu, Jean Renoir, France, in French w/ Eng. St., 110 min., 35mm, 1939)
New 35mm print!

Jean Renoir's masterpiece The Rules of the Game is a scathing critique of corrupt French society cloaked in a comedy of manners. At a weekend hunting party, amorous escapades abound among the aristocratic guests and are mirrored by the activities of the servants downstairs. The refusal of one of the guests to play by society's rules sets off a chain of events that ends in tragedy. “One walks away from it drained and exhilarated, after experiencing a whole world and seemingly every possible emotion in a few swift golden hours.” – Michael Wilmington, CHICAGO TRIBUNE

9h30pm
The Grand Illusion
(La Grande Illusion, Jean Renoir, France, in French w/ Eng. St., 114 min., 35mm, 1938)

Jean Renoir's antiwar masterpiece follows a pair of French soldiers held in a World War I German prison camp. Moved from camp to camp they continually befriend their fellow prisoners and work to escape. Eventually they arrive in a so-called inescapable prison along with some familiar faces amongst both prisoners and guards. Declared “cinema enemy number one” by Joseph Goebbels shortly after its premiere, Grand Illusion is a moving tale of friendship, class, and humanism.

Saturday, November 17

UWM Union Theater
4pm
Rules of the Game
(La Regle du Jeu, Jean Renoir, France, in French w/ Eng. St., 110 min., 35mm, 1939)

7pm

The Grand Illusion
(La Grand Illusion, Jean Renoir, France, in French w/ Eng. St., 114 min., 35mm, 1938)

9h30pm
Rules of the Game
(La Regle du Jeu, Jean Renoir, France, in French w/ Eng. St., 110 min., 35mm, 1939)

Sunday, November 18

UWM Union Theater
4 & 7pm
Rules of the Game
(La Regle du Jeu, Jean Renoir, France, in French w/ Eng. St., 110 min., 35mm, 1939)

Monday, November 5, 2007

Tuesday, November 6

UWM Union Theater / Experimental Tuesdays
7pm *FREE*
We will live to see these things:
An Evening with The Speculative Archive
Artists David Thorne & Julia Meltzer in person!

The Speculative Archive generates acts of research and observation that re-collect existing data and narratives into serial, provocative, and revealing new combinations. Tonight's program will include the five-part documentary video We will live to see these things (2007), with each of the video's sections offering a different perspective on what might come to pass in a place – specifically Syria – where people live between the competing forces of a repressive regime, a growing conservative Islamic movement, and intense pressure from the United States.

Wednesday, November 7

Noon at Alterra
Coffee with DocUquarium guest filmmaker Maria Finitzo (Terra Incognita)
Alterra Coffee Roasters – 2211 N. Prospect Ave.
Join us for an intimate chat with the filmmaker.

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DocUquarium Series – every Wednesday September 5-December 5
“Dive deep” into the newest independent documentaries this fall as filmmaker/professor Brad Lichtenstein opens up his film 301 class to the public. Nine premieres, guests every month and deep explor ation guaranteed. Check the complete schedule at http://www4.uwm.edu/docuwm/ and the blog at http://docuquarium.groups.vox.com/.

This Week’s DocUquarium:
UWM Union Theater
7h30pm *FREE*
Terra Incognita
(Maria Finitzo, USA, 100 min, 2007)

Director Maria Finitzo in person!

Terra Incognita tells the story of Dr. Jack Kessler, the current chair of Northwestern University's Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurological Sciences, and his daughter, Allison, an undergraduate student at Harvard University. When Kessler was invited to head up the Neurology Department at Northwestern, his focus was on using stem cells to help cure diabetes. However, soon after his move to Chicago, Allison--then age 15, was injured in a skiing accident and paralyzed from the waist down. In the moments following the accident, Dr. Kessler made the decision to change the focus of his research to begin looking for a cure for spinal cord injuries using embryonic stem cells. The film follows the constantly evolving interplay between the promise of new discoveries, the controversy of modern science and the resilience and courage of people living every day with devastating disease and injury.

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Basement Cinema
Mitchell Hall - Room B91

Basement Cinema is a student-run series of B and unusual commercial movies.
More information at http://basementcinema.wordpress.com
This week: Stunt men, that crazy breed of individuals willing to risk life and limb, to make someone else look cool. Tonight, Basement Cinema celebrates this anonymous celebrities by putting them in the spotlight.

8pm FREE
The Devil at Your Heels
(Robert Forteir, 1981, 105 minutes)


Ken Carter is the Canadian equivalent of Evel Knievel, in fact he’s even better than Evel. At least Ken thinks so. To prove his greatness Ken plans to drive a rocket-powered car off a ramp and jump the St. Lawerence River. It’s a distance of one mile and the jump will not only send Ken hurtling from Canada into American, but it would put him history books. That is, if he makes it. The Devil at Your Heels is a documentary that feels like a mockumentary, so buckle yourself in and get ready to laugh as one crazed Canadian finds excuse after excuse on why he shouldn’t attempt this jump, all the while proclaiming himself to be the greatest daredevil ever.

10pm FREE
Stunt Rock
(Brian Trenchard-smith, 1978, 86 minutes)


Quickly proving that plots are a tired convention this wild 70’s film slams together mystic rock performances and death defying stunts because, really what else do you need for a kickass film. Between daredevil stunts and performances by the theatrical rock outfit Sorcery, real life Australian stunt man Grant Paige tries to explain to a blonde reporter just what it is that makes stunt men like himself do the crazy things they do. It’s a hybrid film. One part cheesy narrative, one part stunt show, and one part rock concert. Or, as the tagline puts it - Stunt Rock is a death wish at 120 decibels!

Thursday, November 8

African Avant-gardes and the Legacy of John Coltrane in Accra
Colloquium/Presentation by Dr. Steven Feld
4-5h30pm FREE
Fine Arts Recital Hall


The presentation will be built around a screening of Hallelujah!, Steven Feld’s documentary that presents the story of a postcolonial and postmodern African version of G. F. Handel’s Hallelujah chorus, as staged and performed by Ghanaba, the legendary Ghanaian drummer who introduced the talking drum to American jazz musicians in the 1950s, together with the Winneba Youth Choir, a leading choir in Africa. Their unique staging of the Hallelujah chorus mixes elements of African, Christian, Buddhist, and Islamic ritual together with formal European concert performance, Afro-Jazz, and Ghanaian song and dance ceremony. The film is in two parts, the first a document of the performance, the second a conversation with Ghanaba about the political, spiritual, and musical aspects of his approach to Handel.

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UNRULY MUSIC: Electro-Acoustic Music Center 25th Anniversary concert
7h30-9h30 FREE
Fine Arts Lecture Hall


Guest artist Steven Feld presents a collaborative work made with artist Virginia Ryan which documents the Atlantic Ocean where it meets the coast of Ghana. The work features video and 5.1 channel sound, and Feld describes it as "environmental sound art meets visual art," incorporating the sound of the ocean as well as music composed and performed by Feld together with two Ghanaian musicians.
"African avant-gardes and the legacy of John Coltrane in Accra, told through two musicians, one who has invented instruments (afrifones, African winds with sax mouthpieces) to play music inspired by Coltrane, the other who has merged jazz cymbals with African hand and stick drums in order to explore an African conversation with Elvin Jones's drumming. This turns all the sterotypes ---about Africans being trapped in either 'traditional music' or pop' to mush!"

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UWM Union Theater
Thursday – Sunday, November 8-11
Turkish Film Series

The best of recent Turkish cinema, from the poetic to the comedic, these films investigate the diverse lives of Turkish people at home and abroad, negotiating both tradition and modernity. All screenings are FREE and open to the public. Unless otherwise noted films are in Turkish with English subtitles. Sponsored by the Turkish American Association of Milwaukee, The UWM Film Department and the UWM Union Theatre.

The Turkish Film Series has been made possible by a generous grant from the Turkish Cultural Foundation.

7pm
Distant
(Nuri Bilge Ceylan , Turkey , 110 min., 35mm, 2002)

Winner – Grand Prix – 2003 Cannes Film Festival

Mahmut, a successful commercial photographer struggles to come to terms with the growing gap between his artistic ideals and his professional obligations. His tedious workload, and the lingering loss of his ex-wife, leaves him clinging to the melancholic and obsessive routines of his solitary life. Unexpectedly, his distant relative Yusuf arrives in Istanbul and imposes upon Mahmut. The two struggle to connect in this austere story permeated by heartwarming, often comic moments.

Friday, November 9

Exposures: A White Woman in West Africa
3pm *FREE*
Kenilworth Square East
1925 E. Kenilworth Pl. 4th floor
Virginia Ryan and Steven Feld present!

The UWM Film Department, the Center for 21st Century Studies, Cultures & Communities and Voxlox Media present an installation based on Exposures: A White Woman in West Africa, a book of photographs of and by visual artist Virginia Ryan with an essay by anthropologist Steven Feld. After moving to Ghana in 2001, Ryan discovered that she could not take her whiteness for granted, and embarked on a project that transformed her skin into a canvas. For three years, she asked friends and passersby to photograph her as she went about her daily life. When Feld first viewed these documents, he saw in them an “intuitive and reverse anthropology,” a unique contribution to recent debates on whiteness and race in contemporary art and society. Their collaboration is a conversation about photography and race in post-colonial Africa. Ryan and Feld are committed to showing the work in non-art contexts where dialogue about race, gender, class and photographic representation is possible. Join them and local panelists Erica Bornstein (UWM Anthropology), Portia Cobb (UWM Film), Jane Gallop (UWM English), Tom Bamberger (photographer and critic), Mensah Aborampah (UWM Africology) and others as they share their provocative and complex work and explore the questions it raises. Dick Blau moderates.

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UWM Union Theater
Thursday – Sunday, November 8-11
Turkish Film Series

7pm
Head On
(Gegen die Wand, Fatih Akin, Germany/Turkey, in German & Turkish w/ Eng. St., 121 min., 35mm, 2004)

Winner – Golden Bear – 2004 Berlin Film Festival

Cahit, an alcoholic German of Turkish decent, is hospitalized after driving his car into a wall and meets Sibil who recently attempted suicide. She convinces Cahit to marry her so she can escape her strict Turkish family. Together they navigate between their hedonistic lives in the German underground the staid traditions of their Turkish families in this superbly acted punk-rock melodrama.

9h30pm
Internationale
(Beynelmilel, Sirri Sureyya Onder & Muharrem Gulmez , Turkey, 106 min., 35mm, 2006)

Using irony and comedy Beynelmilel depicts the lives of ordinary people affected by the 1980 military coup. A curfew leaves a group of local musicians in southeastern Anatolia unemployed until the martial law commander decides to turn them into a modern orchestra. As the orchestra prepares the welcome ceremony for some visiting politicos, Haydar, a university student, and the conductor's daughter plan a protest.

Saturday, November 10

UWM Union Theater
Thursday – Sunday, November 8-11
Turkish Film Series

5pm
Climates
(Beynelmilel, Sirri Sureyya Onder & Muharrem Gulmez , Turkey, 106 min., 35mm, 2006)
Winner – Fipresci Award – 2006 Cannes Film Festival

Beautifully and meticulously observed, Climates poetically uses landscape to reflect loneliness, loss and the often-elusive nature of happiness. During a sweltering summer vacation, the relationship between middle-aged professor Isa and his younger girlfriend Bahar brutally implodes. Back in Istanbul that fall, Isa rekindles a torrid affair with a previous lover. But when he learns that Bahar has left the city for a job in the snowy East, he follows her there to win her back.

7pm
The Borrowed Bride
(Egreti Gelin, Atif Yilmaz, Turkey/Greece , 119 min., 35mm, 2005)

A moving historical drama set in the 1920's, Emine becomes the “borrowed bride” of the mayor's son Ali and under strict rules prepares him for marriage. The pair fall in love and though she tries to keep the borrowed brides' code, he defiantly refuses his families' marriage plans. Atif Yilmaz's 119th and last film before he died caused controversy in Turkey starting fierce debate on whether the tradition of borrowed brides even existed.

9h30pm
Crossing the Bridge: The Sounds of Istanbul
(Fatih Akin, Germany/Turkey, 90 min., 35mm, 2005)

Alexander Hacke, of the German avant-garde band Einstürzende Neubauten travels Istanbul with a complete mobile recording studio to capture the exotic sounds and musical diversity, ranging from modern electronic sounds, rock and hip-hop, right down to classical “Arabesque” music. Fatih Akin, director of Head-On accompanies him with his camera for a lively portrait of Istanbul's music scene.

Sunday, November 11

UWM Union Theater
Thursday – Sunday, November 8-11
Turkish Film Series

2h30pm
Two Girls
(Iki Genç Kiz, Kutlug Ataman , Turkey , 107 min., 35mm, 2005)

Based on a popular Turkish novel, Two Girls tells the story of two girls from very different backgrounds. Behiye, a rebellious student despises her conservative family. Handan lives with her single mother, a beautiful woman with more liberal world views. Shortly after meeting, they embark on a secret plan to escape their dysfunctional families. Their intense relationship encompasses all that is wonderful and tragic about youth.

5pm
The Play
(Oyun, Pelin Esmer, Turkey, 70 min., 35mm, 2005)

The Play documents nine peasant women living in a remote mountain village in southern Turkey . Their days are taken up by working in the fields, on a construction, and at home. To lighten the burden, these women come together at night to write and eventually perform a play based on their lives.

7pm
Ice Cream, I Scream
(Dondurman Gaymak, Yuksel Aksu, Turkey, in Turkish w/ Eng. St ., 100 min., 35mm, 2006)

Ice Cream, I Scream follows the misadventures of an independent ice cream vendor struggling to stay afloat against the larger ice cream shops. In the tourist town of Mugla a gang of boys steal an ice cream cart, but the owner of the cart believes the corporations are trying to ruin him. An over the top comedy that deals with the changing marketplace of small Turkish towns.

Monday, October 29, 2007

Tuesday, October 30

UWM Union Theater / Experimental Tuesdays
7pm *FREE*
Danièle Huillet: a memorial tribute

A belated tribute to Danièle Huillet, who died at the age of 70 a year ago this month.
Tuesday's program will feature collaborations with her filmmaking partner Jean-Marie Straub, with whom she produced over two dozen films and videos, some of the most rigorous and uncompromising in all of cinema and some of the least screened.

Wednesday, October 31

Basement Cinema
Mitchell Hall - Room B91

Basement Cinema is a student-run series of B and unusual commercial movies.
More information at http://basementcinema.wordpress.com

This week: This Halloween Basement Cinema is no trick and all treat. We’ve got a triple feature of zombie films from three different countries ready to devour your brain.

6pm FREE
Sugar Hill

(Paul Masalansky, 1974, 91 minutes)


Blaxploitation meets voodoo zombie action! The craziness starts when New Orleans mobsters kill Sugar’s boyfriend. Determined to get her revenge, Sugar enlists the help of Baron Zamedi, the Lord of the Dead. Sugar trades her soul for an army of zombies hit men to do her bidding. This is one black cat the mafia will wish never crossed their path.

8pm FREE
Hell of the Living Dead

(Bruno Mattei, 1980, 101 minutes)

A four man SWAT team meet up with two reporters in New Guinea. They are all their to investigate a chemical spill. What they never expected to find where flesh hungry zombies waiting to devour them. Now, they must fight their way of off the island and warn the rest of the world. One of countless Dawn of the Dead inspired zombie films made with Italian money, Hell of the Living Dead (aka Night of the Zombies) deserves recognition for being one of the wildest, craziest, and most laughably enjoyable gore films in this genre.

10pm FREE
Wild Zero

(Tetsuro Takeuchi, 2000, 98 minutes)


Aliens are invading Earth and their arrival has turned most of the world into zombies. The only hope for humanity is a rock ‘n’ roll! Wanna be rocker Ace calls upon his idols Guitar Wolf to use their music instruments to help him save the world from an onslaught of zombies. Starring the actual punk rock trio Guitar Wolf, this Japanese mash-up of rock ‘n’ roll, zombie, and sci-fi movie is one of the most insane films Basement Cinema has ever presented and will surely have folks yelling, “Rock ‘n’ Roll,” in a bad Japanese accent for many days to come.

Thursday, November 1

UWM Union Theater
7pm *FREE*
Phantom Carriage
(Körkalen, Viktor Sjöström, Sweden, 93 min., 35mm, 1922)
Special Day of the Dead Screening!
*New 35mm print

Original score performed live by Chicago's Dropp Ensemble 
(led by Longbox recording artists Salvatore Dellaria and Adam Sonderberg).
On New Year's Eve three men drinking in a graveyard tell the story of the Phantom Carriage. The last sinner to die at the end of the year must drive the carriage of souls at the bidding of Death himself. One of the men laughs off the story but soon finds out that it is all to true. The Phantom Carriage employs dazzling superimpositions to capture the supernatural world of Death in this fantastic tale of redemption.

Friday, November 2

UWM Union Theater
7pm & 9pm
Brand Upon the Brain
(Guy Maddin, Canada/US, 95 min., 35mm, 2006)

Equal parts childhood reminiscence, expressionist horror movie, teen detective serial and Grand Guignol reverie, Brand Upon the Brain! follows the boy Guy Maddin and his teenage sister who live on an island with their overbearing mother, secretive scientist father, and a horde of orphans. When mysterious head wounds are discovered on recently adopted children, teen detectives Wendy and Chance Hale visit the island to investigate. Guy falls hard into his first crush for Wendy while Sis must keep her love for Chance hidden from Mother at all costs.

Saturday, November 3

UWM Union Theater
5pm, 7pm & 9pm
Brand Upon the Brain
(Guy Maddin, Canada/US, 95 min., 35mm, 2006)

Sunday, November 4

UWM Union Theater
5pm & 7pm
Brand Upon the Brain
(Guy Maddin, Canada/US, 95 min., 35mm, 2006)

Sunday, October 21, 2007

Tuesday, October 23

UWM Union Theater / Experimental Tuesdays
7pm *FREE*
"I believe that somewhere, there is something worth dying for, and I think it's amazing”
Video artist/performer Ryan Trecartin in person
Co-presented by the Milwaukee LGBT Film/Video Festival

Welcome to the digital psychedelic world of Ryan Trecartin, whose work – seen on YouTube and in the Whitney Biennial – echoes Jack Smith, the Kuchar Brothers, and PeeWee Herman while being raucously original and exuberantly beautiful. Working with a spirited and zestfully committed collaborative ensemble of like-minded “experimental people,” Trecartin crafts – and quickly and gleefully explodes – narratives both home-grown and marvelously flamboyant.

Ryan Trecartin will be screening I-Be Area, his new video, and will be accompanied by special guest Lizzie Fitch.